Please use Degree Navigator to generate an academic report for the Cognitive Science minor: http://nbdn.rutgers.edu. Degree Navigator is an advising tool designed to help students make informed decisions regarding their academic progress. It allows you to manage your general education, major, and minor requirements.

 

General Description of the Minor Program

Cognitive Science is an interdisciplinary area of scholarship concerned with understanding the nature and development of such intelligent capacities as perception, language, reasoning, planning, problem-solving, and related skills, whether these capacities are instantiated in biological or artificial systems. The goal of the Cognitive Science minor is to provide a structured way for undergraduates to study and carry out research in cognitive science with guidance from faculty members affiliated with the Program in Cognitive Science. Any undergraduate may pursue a minor in cognitive science, regardless of his or her major. The interdisciplinary Cognitive Science minor is likely to be of particular interest to undergraduates majoring in fields that are directly related to cognitive science (e.g., computer science, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, biological sciences, mathematics, statistics, biomathematics, communication, and engineering).
 

Undergraduate Minor Requirements

The interdisciplinary minor in Cognitive Science consists of a minimum of 18 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. At least one of the following three courses:
    • 01:185:201/01:185:202 (offered each fall): Cognitive Science: A Multi-disciplinary Introduction (3 credit course, 1 credit recitation)
    • 01:185:301 (offered every other spring semester): Cognition and Decision Making (4 credits - includes recitation)
    • 01:185:411 (offered each spring): Advanced Topics in Cognitive Science I (4 credits - includes recitation)
  2. A minimum of 3 credits in formal or analytic methods used in cognitive science. 
    For the courses that automatically satisfy this requirement, click here

    Click here to close list

    • 01:198:107: Computing for Math and the Sciences (3)
    • 01:198:111: Introduction to Computer Science (4)
    • 01:198:112: Data structures (4)
    • 01:198:205: Introduction to Discrete Structures I (4)
    • 01:198:206: Introduction to Discrete Structures II (4)
    • 01:615:305: Syntax (3)
    • 01:615:315: Phonology (3)
    • 01:615:325: Semantics (3)
    • 01:615:411: Morphology (3)
    • 01:640:300: Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (3)
    • 01:640:338: Discrete and Probabilistic Models in Biology (3)
    • 01:640:339: Mathematical Models in the Social Sciences (3)
    • 01:640:361: Set Theory (3)
    • 01:640:428: Graph Theory (3)
    • 01:640:454: Combinatorics (3)
    • 01:640:461: Mathematical Logic (3)
    • 01:640:477: Mathematical Theory of Probability (3)
    • 01:640:478: Probability II (3)
    • 01:640:481: Mathematical Theory of Statistics (3)
    • 01:730:101: Logic, Reasoning, and Persuasion (3)
    • 01:730:201: Introduction to Logic (3)
    • 01:730:315: Applied Symbolic Logic (3)
    • 01:730:407: Intermediate Logic I (3)
    • 01:730:408: Intermediate Logic II (3)
    • 01:830:200: Quantitative Methods in Psychology (4)
    • 01:830:302: Sensation and Perception Lab (1)
    • 01:830:304: Memory Lab (1)
    • 01:830:306: Cognition Lab (1)
    • 01:830:312: Condition and Learning Lab (1)
    • 01:830:314: Physiological Psychology Lab (1)
    • 01:830:352: Psychology of Language Lab (1)
    • 01:960:379: Basic Probability and Statistics (3)
    • 01:960:381: Theory of Probability (3)
    • 01:960:382: Theory of Statistics (3)
    • 01:960:401: Basic Statistics for Research (3)

    Click here to close list

  3. A minimum of an additional 12 elective credits. If you take more than the 1 required courses in the 185 curriculum (listed under 1.), any additional 185 course(s) will count as an elective. If you take more than 1 of the approved formal/analytic courses, any additional approved formal/analytic course may be counted as an elective.
    For the courses that automatically satisfy this requirement, click here.

    Click here to close list

    • 01:119:195: Brain, Mind and Behavior (3)
    • 01:146:245: Fundamentals of Neurobiology (for CBN majors) (3)
    • 01:146:295: Essentials in Cell Bio and Neuro (for non-CBN majors) (3)
    • 01:146:445: Advanced Neurobiology I (4)
    • 01:146:447: Advanced Neurobiology II (3)
    • 01:185:200: Apply Cog Sci to Probs in the Real & Virtual Worlds (3)
    • 01:185:253: Human Nature and Diversity (4)
    • 01:185:310: The Concept of Concepts in Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:185:320: Research Methods in Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:185:395: Research in Cognitive Science I (3)
    • 01:185:396: Research in Cognitive Science II (3)
    • 01:185:410: Language and Cognition (3) 
    • 01:185:412: Advanced Topics II - Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:185:495: Research in Cognitive Science I (3) * caveat
    • 01:185:496: Research in Cognitive Science II (3) * caveat
    • 01:198:314: Principles of Programming Languages (4)
    • 01:198:344: Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms (4)
    • 01:198:405: Seminar in Computers and Society (3)
    • 01:198:415: Compilers (4)
    • 01:198:428: Introduction to Computer Graphics (4)
    • 01:198:440: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (4)
    • 01:198:452: Formal Languages and Automata (3)
    • 01:447:380: Genetics (4)
    • 01:447:384: Genetics Analysis I (4)
    • 01:447:385: Genetics Analysis II (4)
    • 01:447:410: Research in Genetics-Writing Intensive (3)
    • 01:447:484: Behavioral and Neural Genetics (3)
    • 01:615:201: Introduction to Linguistic Theory (3)
    • 01:615:330: Historical Linguistics (3)
    • 01:615:350: Pragmatics (3)
    • 01:615:360: Theories of Language (3)
    • 01:615:371: Psychology of Language (3)
    • 01:615:373: Language Acquisition (3)
    • 01:615:421: Language Typology (3)
    • 01:615:431: Investigations into an Unfamiliar Language (3)
    • 01:615:433: Language Acquisition (3)
    • 01:615:435: Experimental Methodologies in Language Acquisition (3)
    • 01:615:441: Linguistics and Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:615:445: Language and Cognition (3)
    • 01:615:451: Phonetics (3)
    • 01:615:471: Selected Topics in Linguistics (3)
    • 01:615:491: Practicum in Linguistics (3)
    • 01:730:210: Philosophy of Language (3)
    • 01:730:220: Theory of Knowledge (3)
    • 01:730:253: Human Nature and Diversity (4)
    • 01:730:328: Philosophy of Psychology (3)
    • 01:730:329: Minds, Machines and Persons (3)
    • 01:730:360: Philosophical Aspects of Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:730:412: Epistemology (3)
    • 01:730:418: Philosophy of Science (3)
    • 01:730:419: Philosophy of Perception (3)
    • 01:730:420: Philosophy of Language (3)
    • 01:730:422: Philosophy of Logic (3)
    • 01:730:424: The Logic of Decision (3)
    • 01:730:425: Philosophy of Mind (3)
    • 01:730:428: Topics in the Philosophy of Psychology (3)
    • 01:830:301: Sensation and Perception (3)
    • 01:830:303: Memory (3)
    • 01:830:305: Cognition (3)
    • 01:830:307: Perception in Cognitive Science (3)
    • 01:830:310: Neuropsychology (3)
    • 01:830:311: Conditioning and Learning (3)
    • 01:830:313: Physiological Psychology (3)
    • 01:830:351: Psychology of Language I (3)
    • 01:830:353: Language Acquisition (3)
    • 01:830:361: Developmental Psychobiology (3)
    • 01:830:401: Advanced Topics in Human Cognition (3)
    • 01:830:402: Advanced Topics in Human Cognition (WI) (3)
    • 01:830:410: Advanced Topics in Psychobiology (3)
    • 01:830:411: Advanced Topics in Psychobiology WI (3)
    • 01:830:412: Neuropsychopharmacology (3)
    • 01:830:463: Behavioral Pharmacology (3)
    • 01:830:480: Advanced Topics in Visual Perception (3)
    • 01:830:484: Language Acquisition (3)
    • 01:940:363: Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World (3)
    • 01:940:368: The Bilingual Mind (3)
    • 01:960:384: Intermediate Statistical Analysis (3)
    • 14:125:405: Introduction to Neural Processes (3)
    • 14:125:410: Sensory Processes, Mechanisms, Computer Models (3)

    Click here to close list

This course list will be updated periodically as appropriate.

 

Additional requirements:

  1. Grades of C or better must be earned in all courses counted toward the minor.
  2. No more than 4 credits at the 100-level may be counted towards the minor.
  3. At least half of the credits towards the minor must be at the 300-level or above.
  4. The same course cannot be used to fulfill both the formal/analytic and elective requirements.
  5. No more than two courses can be taken in any one department.

 

How to Declare a Minor in Cognitive Science

To declare a minor in Cognitive Science, please use myMajor: http://mymajor.sas.rutgers.edu. Students are recommended to declare the minor at the same time, or shortly after, they declare a major field of study.

Students should be aware that many of the courses listed have prerequisites and not all of the courses are offered each semester. Students should contact the departments that offer courses to learn about prerequisites and course schedules. Students may petition the Undergraduate Program Director, Dr. Mary Rigdon, to have additional courses count as formal/analytic or elective courses; email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Cognitive Science Minor Program - Course Offerings

The courses below are offered in the subject area of Cognitive Science. Other courses satisfying the requirements of the minor are offered in areas such as Computer Science, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology and others. These courses are outlined in the above section, and can be looked up at the Rutgers online schedule of classes. [if this link is broken, go to the Rutgers main page http://www.rutgers.edu, select "current students" and then "schedule of classes".]

01:185:200 Apply Cog Sci to Problems in the Real & Virtual Worlds (3)

Examines how research findings have informed our understanding of human cognition, the role of essential processes from neurobiology, perception, and attention, and how these are used when we search, select and remember information, and when we make decisions.
Pre- or corequisite: A course in computer science, linguistics, philosophy, or psychology; or permission of instructor. 

01:185:201/202Cognitive Science: A Multi-disciplinary Introduction (3 credit course, 1 credit recitation)

A Multi-disciplinary Introduction is a lecture/recitation course taught by a single instructor. This course introduces students to the diverse set of concepts and formal and experimental techniques used in cognitive science. Taught in Fall semesters.
Pre- or corequisite: A course in computer science, linguistics, philosophy, or psychology; or permission of instructor.

01:185:253 Human Diversity (3)

Critical analysis of facts, theories, and philosophical issues regarding human diversity in a variety of domains. May include: sex and gender; race; religion; diet; morality and norms; conceptions of the self; perceptions and cognition. Credit not given for both this course and 01:730:253.

01:185:301 Cognition and Decision Making (4)

Cognition and Decision Making is a lecture/recitation course taught by a single instructor. This course introduces students to the subjects of reasoning and decision-making as a means of exploring a number of issues central to the field of cognitive science. Taught in Spring semesters.
Pre- or corequisite: A course in computer science, linguistics, philosophy, or psychology; or permission of instructor.
Course satisfies Core Curriculum: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning (QQ). 

01:185:310    The Concepts of Concepts in Cognitive Science (3)

The Concepts of "Concepts" in Cognitive Science is a lecture course taught by a single instructor. This course introduces students to the study of concepts from a broad interdisciplinary point of view, surveying how concepts are understood in Psychology, Philosophy, Computer Science and Neuroscience. Emphasis is on both differences in how these various disciplines view concepts as well as commonalities in the underlying ideas.
 

01:185:320 Research Methods in Cognitive Science (3)

Prereq: 185:201 or 185:411 or 185:301
Research Methods in Cognitive Science is a lecture course taught by a single instructor. This course introduces students to a foundation for thinking critically about research in cognitive science. Topics may include the scientific method and consideration of strengths and weaknesses of a range of approaches, statistical reasoning and principles for ethical conduct of research.

01:185:395 Research in Cognitive Science (3)

Prereq: Permission of Instructor
May be taken more than once.
Research in Cognitive Science is a supervised research internship in cognitive science. May include laboratory/library research. Final written report required. Pre-requisite: permission of instructor.

01:185:396 Research in Cognitive Science (3)

Prereq: Permission of Instructor
May be taken more than once.
Research in Cognitive Science is a supervised research internship in cognitive science. May include laboratory/library research. Final written report required. Pre-requisite: permission of instructor.

01:185:410 Language and Cognition (3)

Language and Cognition is a lecture course taught by a single instructor. Topics may include speech perception, language acquisition, priming, disorders, speech errors, sentence processing, memory, color, and numerosity.
Pre- or corequisite: 01:185:201 & 202 and 01:615:201; or permission of instructor.
Course satisfies Core Curriculum: Quantitative and Formal Reasoning (QQ).

01:185:411 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Science I (4)

Advanced Topics in Cognitive Science is a seminar course team-taught by faculty affiliated with the Center for Cognitive Science. Faculty from psychology, computer science, linguistics, philosophy, and cognitive science will give single seminars in which they show how these diverse set of concepts and formal and experimental techniques are used to address a particular problem within cognitive science. Taught in Spring semesters.

01:185:412 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Science II (3)

Seminar on computational, linguistic, philosophical, and psychological approaches taken within cognitive sciences through a survey of topics such as reasoning, language, vision, and cognitive development.

01:185:495 Research in Cognitive Science I (3)

Research in Cognitive Science is a supervised research experience or independent study. May include library or laboratory research. Written agreement with supervisor and final written report required.
Pre- or co-requisites: 01:185:201 OR 01:185:411, an approved formal/analytic course, and permission of instructor and undergraduate program director. Open only to juniors and seniors.

01:185:496 Research in Cognitive Science II (3)

Research in Cognitive Science is a supervised research experience or independent study. May include library or laboratory research. Written agreement with supervisor and final written report required.
Pre- or co-requisites: 01:185:201 OR 01:185:411, an approved formal/analytic course, and permission of instructor and undergraduate program director. Open only to juniors and seniors.

* Students who are interested in taking Cognitive Science 495 or Cognitive Science 496 are responsible for finding professors interested in supervising their research, and should approach faculty whose research interests are closest to theirs. Students interested in these courses should be aware that many professors expect a two semester commitment. In addition, students should realize that faculty who participate in the Cognitive Science Center, and hence, are likely to sponsor independent research courses, come from different departments (mainly philosophy, linguistics, computer science, and psychology), and these departments have different perspectives on research courses. For example, in psychology and, to a lesser extent, computer science, students frequently take research courses, but these research courses are usually research internships, with the student working on an ongoing project in the faculty sponsor's lab. In philosophy & linguistics, few students do supervised research projects, but when they do, their research may be somewhat more independent.

Special Permission Required, contact Sue Cosentino at 848-445-1625 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IMPORTANT:

The Individualized Major in Cognitive Science is being replaced with a Major in Cognitive Science resulting in some changes in the requirements for the degree. Unless you have already declared the Individualized Major, you will need to declare the new major.

To learn more about the requirements for the new major, please CLICK HERE.

To contact the Undergraduate Director, Dr. Mary Rigdon, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


(for a printable PDF version of this page click here)

The Individualized Major in Cognitive Science is administered through the Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS). It offers an opportunity for exceptional, creative, self-motivated students to explore innovative and multi-disciplinary approaches to the study of the foundational and computational workings of the mind. Satisfactory completion of the Individualized Major leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree.

The Individualized Major must consist of at least 36 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. One of the following courses: 185:201 (Cognitive Science: A Multi-disciplinary Intro) and/or 185:301 (Cognition and Decision Making) and/or 185:310 (The Concept of Concepts in Cognitive Science) and/or 185:320 (Research Methods in Cognitive Science) and/or 185:410 (Language and Cognition) and/or 185:411 (Advanced Topics in Cognitive Science I).
  2. Grades of C or better must be earned in all courses counted toward the major.
  3. At least one formal/analytic requirement. For courses that automatically satisfy the requirement, click here

    Click here to close list

    • 01:198:107: Computing for Math and the Sciences (3)
    • 01:198:111: Introduction to Computer Science (4)
    • 01:198:112: Data structures (4)
    • 01:198:205: Introduction to Discrete Structures I (4)
    • 01:198:206: Introduction to Discrete Structures II (4)
    • 01:615:305: Syntax (3)
    • 01:615:315: Phonology (3)
    • 01:615:325: Semantics (3)
    • 01:615:411: Morphology (3)
    • 01:640:300: Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (3)
    • 01:640:338: Discrete and Probabilistic Models in Biology (3)
    • 01:640:339: Mathematical Models in the Social Sciences (3)
    • 01:640:361: Set Theory (3)
    • 01:640:428: Graph Theory (3)
    • 01:640:454: Combinatorics (3)
    • 01:640:461: Mathematical Logic (3)
    • 01:640:477: Mathematical Theory of Probability (3)
    • 01:640:478: Probability II (3)
    • 01:640:481: Mathematical Theory of Statistics (3)
    • 01:730:101: Logic, Reasoning, and Persuasion (3)
    • 01:730:201: Introduction to Logic (3)
    • 01:730:315: Applied Symbolic Logic (3)
    • 01:730:407: Intermediate Logic I (3)
    • 01:730:408: Intermediate Logic II (3)
    • 01:830:200: Quantitative Methods in Psychology (4)
    • 01:960:379: Basic Probability and Statistics (3)
    • 01:960:381: Theory of Probability (3)
    • 01:960:382: Theory of Statistics (3)
    • 01:960:401: Basic Statistics for Research (3)

    Click here to close list

  4. A minimum of 3 credits of cognitive science research directed by the student’s primary faculty advisor, 185:495 Research in Cognitive Science. Students may also fulfill this requirement via Departmental Honors or College Honors courses.
    For a list of faculty who can supervise the required 185:495 research course, please check the following two webpages:
    Executive Council Faculty
    Affiliate Members
  5. Two thirds of the total credits must be from courses offered by the School of Arts and Sciences.
  6. Three fourths of the total credits must be at the 300-level or above.

Students should select from one of four possible tracks: Cognitive Neuroscience, Generalist, Language, and Vision. Each track has course recommendations for fulfilling the requirements of the Individualized Major.

 

Applying for the Individualized Major in Cognitive Science:

  1. Select from one of the 4 tracks (listed above).
  2. For a list of faculty members in the Center for Cognitive Science who can advise the required research course, please click here and here.
  3. Submit a written application no later than the first term of your junior year. (Part-time and transfer students may extend this deadline to completion of 75 credits.) 

The application can be downloaded at the following address:
http://ruccs.rutgers.edu/images/downloads/individualized%20major.pdf

Your application must include:

  1. 1-page Statement of Purpose and Learning Goals describing your academic objectives and clearly explaining why they cannot be accomplished within the current structure of majors, minors, and electives open to SAS students.
  2. Proposed listing of courses you intend to complete and the semester when you intend to take the courses. Include short lists of “elective courses” within the major from which you will choose a set number. For example, you can list three specific courses in Psychology and indicate that you will take a minimum of one course from that list for 3 credits.
  3. Signature of your primary faculty advisor who will direct your research course.
  4. The approval and signatures of the Undergraduate Director (2nd signature) and Director of the Center (3rd signature).
  5. The approval and signature of the SAS Dean for Educational Initiatives and the Core Curriculum (Susan Lawrence) or the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Education (Michael Beals). Their offices are located at 35 College Avenue.

 

Advising Centers:

Busch Campus
Busch Campus Center, Rm. 172
732-445-0163

College Avenue Campus
Milledoler Hall, Rm. 103
732-932-7731

Douglass Campus
College Hall, Rm. 104
732-932-9729

Livingston Campus
Lucy Stone Hall, Rm. A-216
732-445-2050

What is Cognitive Science?

Your mind is incredibly complex. It can compute the precise amount of effort needed to pick up a glass, it can recall the lyrics to the Oscar Meyer hot dog song, and it can build a space shuttle. How does our mind compute and manipulate information so well? Researchers in cognitive science have often used the analogy that the mind is like a “computer” – it takes in input, processes the information, and finally gives some output, typically behavioral in nature.

Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field that studies the mind and brain. Cognitive scientists draw ideas from several fields such as computer science, linguistics, mathematics, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology. Each discipline contributes their unique expertise to reach a common goal.

The goal of cognitive science is to understand the code of the mind, focusing on how the mind represents and manipulates knowledge and how mental representations and processes are realized in the brain.

About the Club

The Cog Sci Club is a student organization that typically presents a forum of meetings related to Cognitive Science that bring together presenters and audience members from such fields of study as: Neuroscience, Computer Science, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Psychology, as well as anthropology, biological sciences, mathematics, statistics, biomathematics, communication, and engineering. Additionally, members meet in social gatherings to watch movies or attend special events. The club offers a free space to interact, engage, learn, and share ideas with like-minded peers and professionals from varying perspectives.

Contact Information

To join or ask questions, email us at:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or contact the club President:

Club Officials

  • President: Anna Mallory, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Research Chair: Andrea Martinez, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Treasurer: Gabi Reyes, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Secretary/PR Chair: Adriann Lai, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • High Skull/PR Chair: Yoni Friedman, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Community Service Chair: Knyck Sutherland, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Historian: Anthony Cruz, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Social Media/Alumni Relations: Ranga Tirumala, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Spring 2018 Meetings

Starting January 22, 2018 meetings are every Monday at 8:30-9:30pm in Room A139 of the Psychology Building Annex (Busch) on the following dates (also listed on Facebook): 

There will be free pizza so we hope you will join us for food and conversation!

For information on upcoming meetings, please 'like' us on our Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/RUCogSciClub

Relevant Links

Our Directors

brian mclaughlin headshot small Brian McLaughlin  
Faculty Director 
Room A137, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus 
(848) 445-1612
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
sara headshot small Sara Pixley
Staff Director
Room A135, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus
(848) 445-2973
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
mary rigdon headshot small Mary Rigdon  
Graduate and Undergraduate Director 
Room A103, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus 
(848) 445-1601
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

Staff

Radhames Camilo
Unit Computing Manager (Monday pm, Tuesday, Thursday)
Room A110, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus 
(848) 445-1606
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Hristiyan (Chris) Kourtev
Scientific Programmer
Room A111, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus
(848) 445-4380
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
JoAnn Meli 
Administrative Assistant II
Room A129, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus
(848) 445-6660
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
shiva patel headshot small Shivangiben (Shiva) Patel  
Business Manager  
Room A133, Psychology Building Addition, Busch Campus 
(848) 445-1625
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Special Visiting Research Undergraduate Students: (NOT MATRICULATED, NOT ENROLLED in CLASSES)

For J1 Visitors-In order to visit the Center for Cognitive Science, you are required to pay an Administration Fee of $1,500.  This fee covers administrative duties such as; the preparation of visas, approvals to audit undergraduate classes for education, and office space.

This administration fee is in addition to:

  1. The required Rutgers University SEVIS Administration Fee of $20/# of calendar months covered by the DS-2019  AND
  2. The one year request of $250.  If the one year request requires expedited visa processing there is a fee of $200 as well.
  3. Additionally, a late fee of $100 is required for:
    1. initial requests received within 6 weeks of the requested start date,
    2. extension requests received within 2 weeks of the requested start date
    3. transfers in to Rutgers’s J-1 program from another J-1 programs received within 2 weeks of the requested start date

Special Visiting Research Graduate Students/Research Scholars/Short Term Scholars:

For J1 VIsitors-In order to visit the Center for Cognitive Science, you are required to pay the following fees:

  1. The required Rutgers University SEVIS Administration Fee of $20/# of calendar months covered by the DS-2019  AND
  2. The one year request of $250.  If the one year request requires expedited visa processing there is a fee of $200 as well.
  3. Additionally, a late fee of $100 is required for:
    1. initial requests received within 6 weeks of the requested start date,
    2. extension requests received within 2 weeks of the requested start date
    3. transfers in to Rutgers’s J-1 program from another J-1 programs received within 2 weeks of the requested start date

 


 

Fall 2017 Visiting Student(s):

Undergraduate:

Junjie Lian
Affiliation: Shanghai University, College of Social Sciences (CHINA)
Date: September 1, 2017 to November 30, 2017

 

Fall 2016-Fall 2017 Visiting Student(s):

Graduate:

Jing Wang
Affiliation: Beijing Normal University, Department of Philosophy (CHINA)
Date: September 15, 2016 to September 14, 2017

 

Spring 2016-Spring 2018 Visiting Faculty:

Dr. Liqi Zhu
Affiliation: Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, (CHINA)
Date: March 25, 2016 to March 24, 2018

Contact RuCCS

Psychology Building Addition
152 Frelinghuysen Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020


Phone:

  • 848-445-1625
  • 848-445-6660
  • 848-445-0635


Fax:

  • 732-445-6715