Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS)
processed-attila farkas Dr. Attila Farkas  (Post Doc Associate, LVR)
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Lab of Vision Research

Associates housed in various departments who play an active role in the intellectual life of the Center.

Faculty and researchers associated with RuCCS represent a variety of disciplines. The list below organizes faculty and researchers by their department of affiliation. Clicking on a person's name will direct you to their web page, where information regarding their research interests and recent publications may be found.

Computer Science
  Dr. Alex Borgida
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Development of languages and models for knowledge representation and reasoning.
abdeslam_boularias_small Dr. Abdeslam Boularias
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Machine learning, robotics, planning and learning in partially observable domains, reinforcement learning.
Dr. Mubbasir Kapadia
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Aims to develop agent-centric models for simulating crowd dynamics that challenge foundational assumptions in crowd modeling, while providing solutions that are validated using comparisons to real data, and virtual reality experiments. These solutions can be used to optimize the behavioral dynamics of real crowds and model the relationships between crowd flow and environment features, with applications in predictive analytics and crowd management, and environment layout design. His other research interests include real-time multi-agent planning, character animation for autonomous virtual humans, and digital storytelling.
Dr. Casimir Kulikowski
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Image interpretation using planning and learning techniques; methods of theory formation for classification, configuration, planning and design problems with biomedical applications.
Dr. Dimitris Metaxas  (Biomedical Engineering)
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American Sign Language and Gesture recognition from video, human identification and intent recognition from video, human computer interaction, shape and motion representation for recognition.
konstantinos michmizos Dr. Konstantinos Michmizos
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Basic Research: Computational Modeling of Sensorimotor Behavior, Psychophysics, Functional Neuroimaging
Applied research: Rehabilitation Games for children with disabilities, Robotic Neurorehabilitation
   
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Dr. Kristin Dana
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Computer vision and graphics; computational models for object appearance and image texture with applications in pattern recognition and scene rendering; optical systems for measurements of surface appearance.
Dr. Peter Meer
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Application of modern statistical methods to computer vision and pattern recognition; probabilistic algorithms for machine vision problems; representation of semantical visual information.
   
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Dr. Louis Sass (Psychology)
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Philosophy and psychopathology (especially disorders of self); phenomenological philosophy; Wittgenstein; philosophical aspects of psychoanalysis.
   
La Salle University, Department of Psychology
Dr. Sharon Lee Armstrong
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Clinical Counseling Psychology
   
Lexical Research
  Robert Krovetz
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Word sense disambiguation and lexical semantics; morphology; multiword expressions; applications of natural language processing to education and information retrieval.
   
Linguistics
Dr. Veneeta Dayal
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Semantic theory and the syntax-semantics interface from a cross-linguistic perspective.
Dr. Viviane Deprez
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Theoretical and comparative syntax of natural languages focusing on models of parameterization for deriving grammars from universal principles.
Dr. Kenneth Safir
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Syntactic theory; explanation of anaphora crosslinguistically and across the boundaries of syntax, semantics, pragmatics and language acquisition; formal learnability theory as applied to language acquisition.
   
Mathematics
Dr. Eduardo Sontag
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Alternative models of computation and the mathematical theory of neural networks.
   
Ohio State University
craige roberts Dr. Craige Roberts
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I study linguistic semantics and pragmatics, and am also interested in closely related issues in the philosophy of language.
   
Philosophy
Dr. Frances Egan
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Philosophy of mind and psychology, the epistemology of science and the explanatory role of representational content in computational psychology.
Dr. Barry Loewer
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Philosophical problems concerning intentionality and consciousness; issues of non-monotonic reasoning.
Dr. Robert Matthews
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Foundations of cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics; intentional states and propositional attitude ascriptions; learnability properties of linguistic theories.
   
Psychology
shana cole Dr. Shana Cole
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Social cognitive and perceptual processes involved in successful goal pursuit; self-regulation and self-control.
Dr. Arnold Glass
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Computer models of syntactic parsing and language comprehension.
Dr. Judith Hudson
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Cognitive development; autobiographic memory and development of planning skills.
Dr. Terry Wilson
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Behavior therapy; social learning theory; treatment of eating disorders.
   
Department of Psychiatry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
processed brian keane Dr. Brian Keane
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Perceptual organization—how it works in healthy individuals and how it goes wrong among those with schizophrenia; the clinical and neural implications of visual abnormalities in psychotic disorders; how the mind constructs/maintains representations of objects.
   
School of Communication and Information
Dr. Nicholas Belkin
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Human interaction with information, particularly in information retrieval.
sunyoung kim Dr. Sunyoung Kim
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Human-Computer Interaction, interaction design, mobile and ubiquitous computing, healthcare, everyday wellbeing, environmental sustainability, behavior change
   
Spanish and Portuguese
Dr. Nuria Sagarra
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Psycholinguistics: linguistic and cognitive factors modulating morphosyntactic processing in adult learners (e.g., executive control, cognitive load, language experience), using behavioral (eye tracking, self-paced reading) and electrophysiological (ERPs) techniques.
Dr. Liliana Sanchez 
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Bilingual acquisition of syntax. Convergence and crosslinguistic influence in syntactic representations in bilinguals
   
William Paterson University of New Jersey
Dr. Daniel Kolak  (Department of Philosophy)
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Philosophy of Mind, Cognitive Science, Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic, Philosophy of Physics.

The policies of the Center are set forth by the Executive Council which has representation from several participating departments.

Faculty and researchers associated with RuCCS represent a variety of disciplines. The list below organizes faculty and researchers by their department of affiliation. Clicking on a person's name will direct you to their web page, where information regarding their research interests and recent publications may be found.

 

Biomedical Engineering
Dr. Thomas Papathomas (Laboratory of Vision Research(RuCCS))
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Visual perception of motion, stereo (depth), and texture, and the development of neurophysiologically plausible computational models.
   
Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS)
mary rigdon headshot small Dr. Mary Rigdon  (Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS) - Undergraduate and Graduate Director)
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Decision Sciences, Behavioral and Experimental Economics
   
Computer Science
kostas bekris processed Dr. Kostas Bekris
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Motion and task planning for autonomous robots; Integration of perception and planning for manipulating and interacting with the physical world; Coordination of multiple physical agents, including human-robot interaction.
ahmed-elgammal Dr. Ahmed Elgammal
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Computer Vision and Machine Learning;  statistical models for learning visual manifolds of objects; computational models for recognition of articulated objects; computational art history.
vladimir-pavlovic-processed Dr. Vladimir Pavlovic
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Vladimir's research interests include Bayesian system modeling, time-series analysis, and statistical computer vision. More recently, his research has focused on modeling of human emotions and affect, as well as design of fast, robust, face tracking and identification systems. He is also interested in modeling and analysis of human crowd behavior from the perspective of distributed sensing and decision making systems.
Dr. Matthew Stone  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Reasoning systems for natural language generation and human-computer interaction; formal models of plans, context and mutual knowledge, and linguistic meaning and interpretation.
   
Linguistics
Dr. Mark Baker  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Comparative syntax, linguistic universals, semantic roles, Amerindian and African languages.
processed simon charlow Dr. Simon Charlow
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Formal semanticist working on scope and binding, questions and indefiniteness, focus, dynamic semantics, continuations and monads, ellipsis, and their interactions, especially interested in using insights from other disciplines (in particular, theoretical computer science) to address fundamental questions in linguistic theory.
  Dr. Paul de Lacy  
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The phonetics-phonology interface; articulatory and acoustic phonetics; phonological theory; field methods; markedness and universals.
Dr. Jane Grimshaw  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Representation and acquisition of lexical information; development of minimalist and optimality-based theories of phrase structure and functional projections.
Dr. Kristen Syrett (Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS))
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Language acquisition and development, semantics, syntax-semantics interface, pragmatics, prosody, representation and processing
Dr. Bruce Tesar  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Computational models of language learning, phonology, Optimality Theory, the role of linguistics within cognitive science.
   
Philosophy
thony gillies processed Dr. Thony Gillies
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I work on stuff about how rational(ish) but imperfectly informed agents like us communicate about and operate in an unpredictable world like ours full of other agents. I like proving things (if it’s not too hard) so I tend to be interested in formal models of said stuff. I also have a hobby interest in various parts of the decision sciences.
Dr. Alvin Goldman  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Simulationist versus theory-theory approaches to mindreading, including reading emotion in faces; self-knowledge, self-report, and consciousness; descriptive and normative issues in reasoning; folk ontology.
Dr. Ernest Lepore (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Philosophy of language and philosophy of mind.
brian mclaughlin headshot small Dr. Brian McLaughlin (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS) - Faculty Director)
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The nature of cognitive architecture, including the connectionism/classicism debate; psychosemantics and the theory of meaning for mental representations.
paul pietroski webshot small Dr. Paul Pietroski 
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Thinking about how grammatical structure is related to linguistic meaning, and how words are related to concepts. I have defended a nativist approach to the study of human language and an internalist conception of meaning.
Dr. Susana Schellenberg 
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Perceptual content and mental content more generally, attention, perceptual evidence, the relationship between the phenomenological and epistemological role of perceptual experience, the situation-dependency of perceptual experience, imagination, mental capacities
Dr. Stephen Stich  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Nature and viability of commonsense (or "folk") psychology, moral cognition & moral reasoning and rationality.
   
Psychology
Dr. Jacob Feldman (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Formal, computational and empirical studies of categorization, shape representation, grouping and perceptual inference in visual perception.
pernille-hemmer-processed Dr. Pernille Hemmer
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The influence of prior knowledge on memory and decision making in naturalistic environments.
  Dr. Eileen Kowler  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Study of the sensory cues, spatial representations and cognitive factors that guide patterns of smooth and saccadic eye.
Dr. Alan Leslie  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Conceptual development and the representation of the physical world, of Agency, and of "theory of mind" in infants and preschoolers; also their impairment in autism.
processed john mcgann Dr. John P. McGann
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Research in my laboratory employs neurophsyiological, behavioral, and theoretical methods to explore how humans and rodent models learn information about the world and apply this knowledge to the neural processing of incoming sensory stimuli. We are also interested in how dysfunction in these processes could manifest in mental and neurological disorders.
melchi michel processed Dr. Melchi Michel
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Study of visual search and saccadic eye movements, short-term visual memory, perceptual learning and cue integration. Formal computational and ideal observer modeling of visual tasks and of population coding in visual cortex.
Dr. Julien Musolino  (Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS))
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Specializes in psycholinguistics and research focuses on language acquisition and language processing.
Dr. Manish Singh  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Formal and empirical study of visual object and surface representations. Part-based description of object shape; Computation of surface structure under partial occlusion and transparency; Visual attention.
Dr. Karin Stromswold (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Language acquisition and learnability theory; the cognitive and neural bases of language, language acquisition, and language processing; studies of sentence processing using neuroimaging.
Dr. Elizabeth Torres  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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My interest lies in the study of voluntary actions in general and the emergence of symbolic intelligence from them. In particular, I have been studying natural voluntary arm movements in the context of reaching for and grasping an object, obstacle avoidance, the acquisition and retrieval of a motor program, and more recently on the performance of a parietal patient and of patients with Parkinson's disease. I am also doing research on autism.
Dr. David Vicario  
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Neuroethology. Using behavioral, neurophysiological, and anatomical methods in songbirds to study sensory and motor processes that subserve vocal learning, including auditory memory, perception, and production of learned vocalizations.
   
Psychology-Newark
Dr. Stephen Jose Hanson  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Research focuses on learning, categorization, connectionist models, neural networks, cognitive, mathematical and computational modeling.
   
RWJMS
Dr. Michael Lewis  (Center for Cognitive Science(RuCCS))
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Emotional development and the role of cognition. Cognition, attribution and psychopathology. Face-voice integration in ASD.
For Dr. Lewis' Wikipedia page click here.

General Description of the Certificate Program

The Center for Cognitive Science does not grant degrees. However, students earning degrees in participating departments can earn a Certificate in Cognitive Science by successfully completing the Certificate requirements in addition to those necessary for their graduate degree.

Cognitive Science is an interdisciplinary area of scholarship concerned with understanding the nature and development of such intelligent capacities as perception, language, reasoning, planning, problem-solving, and related skills, whether these capacities are instantiated in biological or artificial systems. Members of the Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS) may have joint appointments with such participating academic departments as Psychology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Computer Science, and others as the program develops. RuCCS also has working relationships with a number of other graduate programs (such as Biomedical Engineering, the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the School of Information, Communication, and Library Studies) and with other research centers on campus.

The goal of the Cognitive Science Certificate program is to provide a structured way for students enrolled in various graduate programs to study and carry out research in Cognitive Science with guidance from relevant faculty advisors, and to bring interested students from different departments together in a graduate student community integrated into the general university research community.

This list of courses is not meant to be exhaustive. Proposals for adding additional courses in various departments, such as (but not limited to) the School of Information, Communication and Library Studies, the Graduate School of Education, the Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, the department of Mathematics, and the departments of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, will also be considered by the certificate committee for credit towards the Certificate in Cognitive Science.

To contact the Graduate Director, Dr. Mary Rigdon, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Certificate Program Requirements

Admission to the Certificate Program and the selection of courses and required research project is subject to the approval of the Cognitive Science Certificate Committee (CSCC). Admission is based on academic performance and interests, and requires the approval of the graduate program of the department in which the student is enrolled. The CSCC is drawn from the RuCCS faculty, augmented where appropriate in order to provide representation from participating departments.

To receive the Certificate in Cognitive Science the student must successfully complete the requirements for a postgraduate degree in the department in which the student is registered, and must also meet the following additional requirements (note that these requirements may in some cases be met without taking additional courses beyond those allowed as electives in the student's program):

  1. Successful completion of the ProSeminar in Cognitive Science (16:185:500). This is a multidisciplinary graduate survey seminar taught by various Cognitive Science faculty. Its purpose is to promote commonality among students' backgrounds and also to allow students to learn about one another's research interests. ( This course is only offered in the Fall semester )
  2. Completion of a research project under the direction of a participating faculty member, normally outside the program in which the student is registered. Project proposals must be approved by the Certificate Committee. (Course number 16:185:699)
  3. A minimum of 9 additional credits from the courses listed below. A minimum of 6 of the 9 credits must be taken from outside the graduate department in which the student is registered. Courses offered by Cognitive Science (program number 185) are considered to be outside of the student's home graduate department. Exceptions and substitutions may be made, including courses from other departments and graduate programs, subject to the approval of the Certificate Committee. This course list will also be updated periodically as appropriate.

Cognitive Science Program Course Offerings

16:185:500. Proseminar in Cognitive Science.
This seminar introduces graduate students to the core areas of Cognitive Science. This is a multidisciplinary graduate survey seminar taught by various Cognitive Science faculty. Its purpose is to promote commonality among students' backgrounds and also to allow students to learn about one another's research interests.
16:185:600,601,602,603,604. Seminar in Cognitive Science I, II, III, IV, V.
These are seminars that will be run from time to time by Participating Faculty as well as by qualified visiting scholars at the Center.
16:185:699. Independent Studies in Cognitive Science.
A supervised independent-study credit. At the discretion of the Certificate Committee it may be taken to meet the research project requirement for the Certificate in Cognitive Science.

Qualifying Courses

1.) Biomedical Engineering (16:125)

  • 513 Visual Research and Instrumentation
  • 516 Visual Pattern Recognition
  • 520 Neuroelectric Systems
  • 525 Biological Control Systems
  • 526 Brain Dynamics
  • 530 Nonlinear Dynamics, Chaos, and Fractals
  • 532 Cyto-Mechanics
  • 610 Advanced Topics in Computers in Biomedical Engineering
  • 615 Advanced Topics in Brain Research
  • 615 Advanced Topics in Brain Research (Human and Computer Vision)
  • 620 Neural Networks and Neurocomputing

2.) Cognitive Science (16:185)

  • 600 Seminar in Cognitive Science I
  • 601 Seminar in Cognitive Science II
  • 602 Seminar in Cognitive Science III
  • 603 Seminar in Cognitive Science IV
  • 604 Seminar in Cognitive Science V

3.) Computer Science (16:198)

  • 452 Formal Languages and Automata
  • 509 Foundations of Computer Science
  • 503 Computational think
  • 504 Computational model
  • 513 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • 520 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
  • 530 Knowledge-Based Design
  • 531 Artificial Intelligence Software
  • 532 Foundations of Knowledge Representation
  • 533 Natural Language Processing
  • 535 Pattern Recognition
  • 536 Machine Learning
  • 587 Expert Systems
  • 598 Topics in Problem Solving Methods
  • 671 Seminar: Computer Vision

4.) Linguistics (16:615)

  • 510 Syntax I
  • 511 Syntax II
  • 514 Topics in Syntactic Theory
  • 520 Phonology I
  • 521 Phonology II
  • 524 Topics in Phonological Theory
  • 530 Semantics I
  • 531 Semantics II
  • 534 Topics in Semantic Theory I, II

5.) Philosophy (16:730)

  • 510 Mathematical Logic
  • 513 Logic and Natural Language
  • 570 Seminar in Philosophy of Language
  • 575 Seminar in Philosophy of Mind
  • 579 Topics in Logic
  • 664 Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Social Science
  • 670 Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Language
  • 675 Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Mind
  • 676 Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Psychology
  • 678 Advanced Topics in Decision Theory

6.) Perceptual Science (16:714)

  • 521 Integrative Methods in Perceptual Science I
  • 522 Integrative Methods in Perceptual Science II

7.) Psychology (16:830)

  • 513 Neurolinguistics
  • 514 Sensation and Perception
  • 515 Computational Vision
  • 534 Psychology of Decision Making
  • 546 Memory and Attention
  • 547 Computational Models of Cognition
  • 550 Language Development
  • 552 Perceptual Development
  • 554 Development of Cognitive Processes
  • 555 Nervous System and Behavior
  • 602 Psycholinguistics
  • 611 Seminar in Perception
  • 637/638 Seminar in Cognition

 

Additional Qualifying Courses The list of courses above is not meant to be exhaustive. Proposals for adding additional courses in various departments, such as (but not limited to) the School of Information, Communication and Library Studies, the Graduate School of Education, the Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, the department of Mathematics, and the departments of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, will also be considered by the certificate committee for credit towards the Certificate in Cognitive Science.

Admission to the Certificate Program

If you have an interest in Cognitive Science you should at some stage -- preferably on (or even before) your arrival at a Rutgers as a graduate student -- let the director of the Certificate Program know of your interest by submitting to him your registration information. You will then be classified as a Cognitive Science Student and placed on our mailing list for announcements of Cognitive Science events (such as lectures and special courses). You will also be expected to participate actively in a Graduate Student Speaker series and to give talks on your ideas or your work-in-progress. You would also be expected to attend our colloquia, visiting speakers' talks and non-credit mini-courses of interest to you. Failure to take an active part in the activities of the Center will result in your being deleted from our list of active Cognitive Science Students.

Students in good standing in their departments may also petition the director of the Certificate Program for admission as official candidates for the Certificate in Cognitive Science. This will normally occur after students have completed the required Cognitive Science ProSeminar (16:185:500). Such official Certificate Candidates will be assigned a faculty advisor who will advise them with regard to courses and research requirements for the Certificate. If you are one of these students you would be eligible to compete for the limited supply of Cognitive Science Graduate Fellowships. The expectation is that if you maintain a satisfactory standing as a Certificate Candidate, as determined by the the Cognitive Science Certificate Committee, and meet all the formal requirements, you would be granted a Certificate in Cognitive Science at the time that you receive your graduate degree. This Certificate, along with your transcript and the endorsement of the program, will identify you as having attained special training in the interdisciplinary field of Cognitive Science.

Under special circumstances students may be admitted as Candidates for the Certificate program, and be eligible for a Cognitive science Fellowship, at the time they are first admitted to a graduate program at Rutgers. Such students will have an exceptional record and a demonstrated commitment to the interdisciplinary study of Cognitive Science. Also under special circumstances students may petition the Certificate Committee for equivalent-credit for courses taken elsewhere or for independent research work.

Guidelines for the Independent Research Project

One of the requirements for obtaining a Certificate in Cognitive Science is to complete an independent research project that will provide breadth of experience outside of the methodologies typically used in the student's home discipline.

The expectation is that in the second year of their candidacy for the Certificate (i.e. the academic year following their Proseminar credit) students will register in course 16:185:699 -- Independent Studies in Cognitive Science. This entails finding a supervisor from among the faculty associated with the Center but outside the department in which the student is registered. Together they would work out a proposal for a project -- which may involve library research, theoretical work, programming or running experiments. Once a brief written proposal is approved by the supervisor and the Director of the program, the student would carry out the research project according to a mutually agreed schedule. Although it is not easy to specify the scope of the project and report, it will be a larger piece of work than a course paper but less that a MA or MSc thesis. A journal article would be an appropriate model to aim for.

Normally the project is expected to be started in the second year and to take less than a calendar year to complete. In order to allow a project of some depth, it is recommended that the research be on a topic with which the student is already familiar -- for example, an area of research related to the student's dissertation work -- but approached from the perspective of a allied discipline.

Contact Information 

Phones: 848-445-1625, 848-445-6660, 848-445-0635
Fax: (732)-445-6715
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Location: Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS) is located in the Psychology Building Addition on Busch Campus. See map
Mailing Address: Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science (RuCCS)
Center for Cognitive Science & Lab of Vision Research  
Psych Bldg Addition, Busch Campus  
Rutgers University - New Brunswick  
152 Frelinghuysen Road  
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020 

 

Directions to RuCCS:

From North:
Take the Parkway South to Exit 129 (440/287 North).
Stay on 287 North to Exit 9 (River Road/Bound Brook).
At end of exit ramp, make a left onto River Road and follow signs for Highland Park/Rutgers.
(Please note: If you take Exit 9 from 287 SOUTH, you must make a RIGHT at the end of the exit ramp!).
Follow River Road approximately 2 miles—at a traffic light turn left onto Hoes Lane.
Follow Hoes Lane until you come to a fork in the road and see a Busch Campus Sign.
Make a right onto Frelinghuysen Road (A golf course will be on your right).
Follow Frelinghuysen Road.  You will then see the Laboratory for Cancer Research on your left. 
Just after the Cancer Research Center, you will turn left into the second driveway (Lot 49—in front of the Psychology Building ).

—or—

Take the NJ Turnpike to Exit 9. At exit, take Route 18 North toward New Brunswick. 
Continue on Route 18 and stay left over a bridge (you’ll now be on the new Route 18). 
Take the Busch Campus/Stadium Exit (on right) and follow long exit ramp to roundabout (traffic circle) on campus. 
Merge right through roundabout and take the second turnoff onto Frelinghuysen Road. 
Continue on Frelinghuysen Road and directly past Allison Road intersection,
Make first right into Lot 49-52.

From South:
Parkway North to Exit 127 (440 South to 287 North). Follow directions above from 287 North.

—or—

Route 18 North past NJ Turnpike and Route 1 Exits—Follow above directions from NJ Turnpike.

From West:
Route 27 North to River Road (left at traffic light). At second traffic light, turn right onto the new Route
18. Follow above directions from Route 18

To obtain parking permit: make a right into the first driveway after Allison Road. 
Park (temporarily) in the driveway and then go to room "A"133 (Shiva Patel) or "A"129 (Jo'Ann Meli) to get a parking permit.  

Enter the Psychology Building at the far right entrance - the new Addition to the Psychology Building (go around the cement ivy wall, down the stairs to your right into the building.  Once in the building, go down the stairs again.  

Maps: 

For a map of Busch Campus, click here
The Psychology Building Addition is the part adjacent to Allison Road, next to parking lot 49. 

Contact RuCCS

Psychology Building Addition
152 Frelinghuysen Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020


Phone:

  • 848-445-1625
  • 848-445-6660
  • 848-445-0635


Fax:

  • 732-445-6715