News

Rutgers graduate students protest tax reform

Graduate students at Rutgers University protested on Wednesday, their lives and academic futures clouded by uncertainty. They claim the tax reform bill proposed by House Republicans would strip out special waivers they count on to survive financially.

“This seems almost counterproductive because the tax bill would make it more difficult for grad students to stay in grad school because they won’t be able to afford to be here,” said graduate student Dee Payton.

“It would just make everything very difficult. A lot of my colleagues would drop out,” graduate student Morgan Moyer said.

Moyer’s pursuing a degree in linguistics and cognitive science. She’s one of about 145,000 grad students nationwide ...

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Dr. Papathomas' Illusion Research featured by Scientific American

Read and experience Dr. Thomas Papathomas’s captivating illusions in this edition of Scientific American. Dr. Papathomas is a long time Executive Council member for the Center for Cognitive Science, where he works on visual perception and the development of neurophysiologically plausible computational models.

Click here to read more.

Oct. 23, 2017 - Panel Discussion: “Do we have an immaterial soul (or mind)?”

Many people believe that we possess an immaterial soul that will survive the death of our bodies. Recent advances in science and other fields have caused some to challenge this notion. Drawing on ideas from biology, psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy, a set of panel speakers with opposing views will debate this age-old question.

Speakers included the Director of RuCCS Dr. Brian McLaughlinDr. Mark Baker, Dr. Julien Musolino.

UPDATE: Event video and photos now available.

Read more: Oct. 23, 2017 - Panel Discussion: “Do we have an immaterial soul (or mind)?”

Dr. Elizabeth Torres Discovers a Way to Detect and Measure Female Autism, Asperger's

Dr. Torres and her lab members have made a breakthrough discovery. They found that tracking and measuring the involuntary head movements revealed in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans offers a new, more accurate way to detect autism in girls.

The breakthrough research was featured on Rutgers Today and NJTV News.