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2019 Meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists

From Friday, March 22, 2019
To Saturday, March 23, 2019

Academic Building, room 1180 (East Wing)

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Location

Academic Building, room 1180 (East Wing)
15 Seminary Place
New Brunswick, NJ 08903

(~15 min walk from Hyatt Hotel, New Brunswick and 10 min walk from NJ Transit train station, New Brunswick). (Need parking information? contact eileen.kowler@rutgers.edu a few days in advance)

Click map for more details.

 

Walking directions: Hyatt Hotel to site of the conference (Rutgers Academic Building, East Wing):

Leave the Hyatt main entrance and turn right. Walk to and across Albany Street and turn left. Walk one block to George Street and turn right. Continue under the train tracks, cross Somerset Street, and enter campus (slight left) through the Class of 1883 Memorial Gate. Continue on the path, passing the Alexander Hamilton historical plaque (on your right) and the Kirkpatrick Chapel (1873) (on your left). Take the path behind the chapel, walking along a slight downgrade and exiting through the Class of 1902 Memorial gate. Cross Hamilton Street. Continue walking straight, through the Vorhees Mall, ending at the statue of William the Silent. Cross Seminary Place to the Rutgers Academic Building west wing. Turn right to get to the East Wing of the RAB, and the conference room 1180.

 

Hyatt Hotel:  2 Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ. 
A portion of the walk from the Hyatt will take you past the original campus buildings, including the Schanck Observatory (1866), Kirpatrick Chapel (1873) and the statue of William the Silent (1533-1584).
See: https://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/scua/paths-to-historic-rutgers

 

Parking

For those visitors who are driving to SEP, visitor parking is available in Lots 26, 30 (behind the Student Center at 126 College Ave) and the College Avenue Deck (622 George Street). Visitors must use the link to register cars in advance:
https://rudots.nupark.com/events/Events/Register/46d6baad-6438-40d5-b4df-42a69b7cfa77

 

RSVP

Rutgers faculty, staff, students, and guests may RSVP here.

 

All talks will be 20 minutes (15 + 5 questions). Time limits will be strictly followed.

Friday, March 22, 2019

7:30-8:30 am Registration and continental breakfast outside conference room. Coffee, tea, water and snacks, available during all breaks.
8:30-8:45 am Introduction and logistics
   
  Session 1
8:45-9:05 am Randy Gallistel, Contingency in conditioning
9:05-9:25 am Sharon Thompson-Schill, The dynamic nature of semantic memory: Using concepts can change them
 9:25-9:45 am Kenneth Norman, Nonmonotonic plasticity: How memory retrieval drives learning
   
9:45-10:00 am Break
   
  Session 2
10:00-10:20 am Wilson Geisler, Local reliability weighting explains identification of partially-masked objects in natural images
10:20-10:40 am Mary Peterson, Two varieties of semantic influences on object detection
10:40-11:00 am George Sperling, Theory of the perceived motion direction of equal-spatial-frequency plaid stimuli
   
11:00-11:15 am Break
   
11:15 am -Noon Warren Medal Address
   
Noon-1:30 pm Lunch. LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED OUTSIDE THE CONFERENCE ROOM
   
  Session 3
1:30-1:40 pm Reconvene
1:40-2:00 pm Tom Griffiths, Rational process models
2:00-2:20 pm Jessica Andrews-Hanna, The dynamics of thought: A window into wandering and sticky minds
2:20-2:40 pm Michael Kahana, A retrieved-context theory of mood and affective disorders
2:40-3:00 pm Stephen Link, Fact, context and judgment
   
3:00-3:15 pm Break
   
  Session 4
3:15-3:35 pm Michael Kubovy, Strands and the structure of lives
3:35-3:55 pm Barbara Knowlton, The effect of contextual interference on implicit sequence learning
3:55-4:15 pm David Huber, Testing the primary and convergent retrieval model of recall: Recall practice produces faster recall success but also faster recall failure
   
4:15-5:00 pm Lifetime Achievement Award
5:00-5:15 pm Business Meeting

Dinner on your own (many options; details to be presented at the meeting)

 

Saturday, March 23, 2019

7:30-8:30 am Registration and continental breakfast outside conference room. Coffee, tea, water and snacks, available during breaks.
   
  Session 5
8:30-8:50 am Jeremy Wolfe, We underestimated your capacity: Introducing multiple object awareness
8:50-9:10 am William Warren, The cognitive graph meets the impossible heptagon
9:10-9:30 am Irving Biederman, Why is it so difficult to recognize faces differing only moderately in orientation
   
9:30-9:45 am Break
   
  Session 6
9:45-10:05 am Saul Sternberg, Shapes of reaction-time distributions and the ex-Gaussian straitjacket
10:05-10:25 am Randall Engle, Measurement of attention control
10:25-10:45 am Jerome Busemeyer, Markov versus quantum dynamic models of belief change during evidence monitoring
   
10:45-11:00 am Break
   
  Session 7
11:00-11:20 am Caren Rotello, Validity of researcher inference in recognition memory: A blinded validation study
11:20-11:40 am Stephen Grossberg, Neural dynamics of autistic repetitive behaviors and fragile X syndrome
11:40 am-Noon Janet Metcalfe, Is the ‘Learning from Errors’ benefit due to episodic recollection or semantic mediation?
   
Noon-2 pm Lunch. Many options are available within easy walking distance of the conference room. Details will be available at the meeting.
   
  Session 8
2:00-2:20 pm Robert Sekuler, Audiovisual combination with temporal correlation and time pressure
2:20-2:40 pm James T. Townsend, Assay of mean shift integrality using GRT and SFT and the Hering illusion
2:40-3:00 pm Moshe Bar, Overarching states of mind
   
3:00-3:15 pm Break
   
  Session 9
3:15-3:35 pm Herbert Terrace, Why only us?
3:35-3:55 pm Richard Shiffrin, Sequential decision making by two selfish but rational agents, with or without communication
3:55-4:15 pm Richard Aslin, The importance of prediction in learning and development
4:15-4:35 pm Robert Nosofsky, Building a feature-space representation for a natural-science category domain
  Conference talks end 4:35
   
6:00-9:00 pm SEP Banquet at the Zimmerli Art Museum, 71 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick. 10 minute walk from hotel and 5 minutes from NJ Transit Station. Galleries will be open before and during the banquet. http://www.zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu/

Some spaces available. Those who wish to attend but did not already register for the banquet, please contact eileen.kowler@rutgers.edu by March 12.

 

 

Acknowledgements

SEP gratefully acknowledges the support of the Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science and the help of Dr. Sara Pixley (Executive Director), Jo'Ann Meli (Senior Program Coordinator), Lynn Flannery (Center Administrator) and Chris Kourtev (Programming and tech support).