What is Cognitive Science

Visual, motor, and social contributions to the perception of human movement

Dr. Margaret Shiffrar

Thursday, October 09, 2003, 12:00pm - 07:00pm

Psychology, Rutgers University - Newark

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October 9, 2003 at 12:00 p.m.

Psychology Room 101, Busch Campus

Dr. Margaret Shiffrar

Psychology, Rutgers University - Newark

Visual, motor, and social contributions to the perception of human movement

The visual system appears to treat human and object motions differently.  For example, visual motion integration across space has been found to significantly differ for human and object movements whenever perceived human movement is upright and consistent with normal locomotion.  Furthermore, apparent motion studies have suggested that human and object movements are differently perceived across temporally extended display intervals.  Why, given these results, does the visual analysis of human movement differ from the analysis of object movement?  Psychophysical and brain imaging data support two conclusions.  Firstly, human movement represents the only category of visual motion that observers can both produce and perceive.  Consistent with this, the visual analysis of human movement appears to depend upon motor system input in a manner that differs from other visual motion analyses.  Secondly, human movement is often the most commonly occurring motion in our inherently social environments.  Recent psychophysical results suggest that frequency may account for some, but not all, of our enhanced visual sensitivity to human movement.  In this talk, I'll discuss these and other contributions to the visual analysis of human movement.

 

Dr. Margaret Shiffrar


"What is Cognitive Science?"

This lunchtime talks series is designed to introduce the University community to issues in Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science is one the the few fields where modern developments in computer science and artificial intelligence promise to shed light on classical problems in psychology and the philosophy of the mind. Ancient questions of how we see the world, understand language, and reason, and questions such as 'how a material system can know about the outside world', are being explored with the powerful new conceptual prosthetics of computer modeling.

The talks in this lunchtime lecture series are every Thursday during the Fall semester from ** 12:00-1:00 ** in the Psychology Building, Room 101 on  Busch Campus.

Note: Talks are also announced by email (with reminders sent the day of the talk) to people who have requested to be placed on our announce list. If you would like to be added to our announce list, please email the Business Office (business_manager@ruccs.rutgers.edu).